National Poetry Month: Ode

Ode

The ode is of Greek origins. It is an analysis of whatever the ode is to: a source of inspiration, an event, an object, a person or an idea. Originally, it was accompanied with music which gradually lead to odes being sung. There are three forms of odes: Pindaric, Horatian, and irregular.

Basics

  • The Pindaric ode is classically structured in three major parts: The Strophe, the Antistrophe, and the Epode (the turn from one side to the other, the turning back to the other side, and the reflective conclusion)
  • The Horatian ode uses meter and rhyme. ABAB CDECDE
  • The irregular ode uses meter and rhyme as well, but not in any particular order

Examples

  • The Odes of Horace DB059845
  • The Odes of Pindar DB022895
The word "Ode" is front and center in red and white letters. The background is the rising sun reflecting on the ocean.

The word “Ode” is front and center in red and white letters. The background is the rising sun reflecting on the ocean.

 

April marks National Poetry Month! Throughout this month we will share information about some of the varying poetry styles practiced today and a little bit about their history. The purpose of the month is to increase the awareness and appreciation of poetry, and maybe help a few people find their inner poet talent.
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About nclbph

The North Carolina Library for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NCLBPH) is a special public library that circulates books and magazines especially made for persons who cannot use regular printed material because of a visual or physical disability. The library is located in Raleigh, but mails materials throughout the state. The NCLBPH is a state agency operated by the State Library of North Carolina as a part of the Department of Natural and Cultural Resources. It is also a part of the network of regional libraries operated by the Library of Congress National Library Service for the Blind and Physically Handicapped (NLS).
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